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UNCLAIMED PROPERTY FOCUS is a blog written by and for UPPO members, featuring diverse perspectives and insights from unclaimed property practitioners across the U.S. and Canada. We welcome your submissions to Unclaimed Property Focus. Please contact Tim Dressen via with any questions about submitting a blog post for consideration and refer to our editorial guidelines when writing your blog post. Disclaimer: Information and/or comments to this blog is not intended as a substitute for legal advice on compliance or reporting requirements.


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Illinois Official Addresses Unclaimed Property Legislation Questions

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, November 28, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, November 28, 2017

On Nov. 14, 2017, Allen Mayer, deputy general counsel for the Illinois Treasurer’s Office, spoke to the Illinois Chamber of Commerce about the Illinois Revised Uniform Unclaimed Property Act. UPPO submitted several questions, most of which Mayer addressed during his presentation. Sara Lima and Freda Pepper, members of UPPO’s Government Relations and Advocacy Committee, attended the event.


According to Lima, Mayer’s attitude toward the state’s new law was exceedingly positive, as would be expected given that the law “favors the state’s position on many ambiguous legal issues.” Of particular note, Mayer described Illinois’ prior unclaimed property law as an “antiquated mess” and characterized the prior business-to-business exemption as a “loophole” that has now been closed.  


Has the legislature considered the constitutionality issues raised by the transitional provision? Requiring Holders to look back 10 years (five-year requirement plus five-year dormancy period) to report otherwise exempted property raises due process issues. 

Mayer said that, although he cannot speak for the Illinois General Assembly, he considers the lookback period to be eight years (five-year requirement plus three-year dormancy period under the new Illinois unclaimed property statues). He noted that he personally researched the constitutionality issue and believes the exemption can be retroactively revoked, citing Riggs Nat. Bank v. District of Columbia (581 A.2d 1229) in particular.


In attempting to comply with the transitional provision, records dating back to that period of time will most likely not exist, particularly because there has been no record retention requirement contained in Illinois’ unclaimed property law. What will be the consequences of not being able to “catch up” report when these records are no longer available?

Mayer responded that there has always has been a record-retention provision, although it was hard to find before the new Illinois unclaimed property legislation. He cited Section 11(h)(ii), which proscribes a five-year retention from when property is reportable. According to Mayer, holders who report “catch up” property on the 2018 report will not be subject to interest and penalties. He also invited feedback and suggestions on how the state should otherwise deal with the issue.


Has there has been any study of the impact of the transitional provision on the business community?

Mayer did not directly respond to this question.


Has there has been any study of the impact of the removal of the B2B exemption on the business community?

Mayer said there were some fiscal projections and that the exemption was not as significant as he believes many expected. He noted that he believes companies may not have been fully using the exemption in practice.


What specifically will the administrative rules be addressing?

Mayer did not provide any specific topics, but noted Illinois will be considering pay cards (possibly in new legislation) and is open to informal discussion about this topic.


Could you please provide clarification of when reports are expected to be filed by investment companies? Are they considered “business associations” that are required to file by May 1?

Mayer specified that investment companies are business associations, required to file by May 1. He said he would be open to including clarification in future legislation.


Tags:  Illinois  RUUPA 

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Illinois Passes New Unclaimed Property Act, Repeal Effort Underway

Posted By Administration, Thursday, July 20, 2017

On July 6, 2017, Illinois budget bill S.B. 9 became law after the House voted to override the governor’s veto. Among the provisions added to the bill shortly before passage was the Illinois Revised Uniform Unclaimed Property Act, which repeals the state’s current unclaimed property statute and replaces it with new language. 


S.B. 9’s unclaimed property provisions become effective on Jan. 1, 2018. However, a movement to repeal the Illinois RUUPA is already underway. 


Illinois RUUPA

Among the Illinois RUUPA provisions that are most noteworthy for holders are:

  • The new statute’s definition of escheatable “property” specifically excludes game-related digital content, loyalty cards and gift cards. The definition of “stored-value card” specifically excludes loyalty cards and game-related digital content but includes gift cards. Because stored-value cards are escheatable property, these opposing definitions present an obvious conflict for holders that deal with gift cards. 
  • The new statute defines “virtual currency,” and includes it within the list of escheatable property.
  • Tax-deferred accounts are considered abandoned under the new statute three years after either the required distribution date for avoiding tax penalties, or the 30th anniversary of the account’s opening date—whichever is earlier. Earlier abandonment dates are specified for deceased owners of such accounts. The statute specifically includes health savings accounts in the tax-deferred account provision. 
  • Similarly, the statute includes detailed provisions regarding custodial accounts for minors.
  • Holders are required to maintain records for 10 years. Retained records must include unclaimed property report information; the date, location and circumstances that led to the property rights; property value; last-known owner address; details for items that were not reported as unclaimed; and details related to money orders, traveler’s checks and similar instruments. 
  • The statute incudes a “transitional provision” that requires holders to file an initial report for property that was not previously reportable, but is reportable under the new statute for a period of five years from the effective date (Jan. 1, 2018). 
  • The state’s current business-to-business unclaimed property exemption is excluded from the new law. 


Repeal Effort

Before S.B. 9 passed, efforts to repeal the Illinois RUUPA provisions were already underway. On July 3, 2017, Rep. David McSweeney introduced H.B. 4078, which specifies that if S.B. 9 becomes law, the Illinois RUUPA provisions contained in S.B. 9 will be repealed, effective immediately. If passed, the state’s current unclaimed property law, the Uniform Disposition of Unclaimed Property Act, would remain in effect. Before the Illinois legislature’s recess, 19 representatives signed on as co-sponsors of the bill. 


For the latest information about this and other noteworthy unclaimed property bills, visit UPPO’s govWATCH website



Tags:  B2B exemption  gift cards  Illinois  RUUPA  unclaimed property  virtual currency 

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2017 Unclaimed Property Legislative Roundup

Posted By Administration with contribution by Marcella Easly, senior compliance advisor at UPCR, Thursday, July 13, 2017

Across the nation, unclaimed property has been a popular topic for state legislatures this year. Although a handful of state legislatures are still in session, most have completed their work. Following is a brief summary of some of the most noteworthy unclaimed property bills that became law during the 2017 session. 



Effective on Feb. 2, 2017, S.B. 13 adopts in substance many provisions from the 2016 Revised Uniform Unclaimed Property Act promulgated by the Uniform Law Commission. In addition, it adopts certain recommendations from the Delaware Unclaimed Property Task Force formed under Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 59 of the 147th General Assembly, and makes significant changes to the state's unclaimed property reporting process and compliance initiatives. More specifically, these changes include reducing the look-back period of all voluntary disclosure agreements and audits to 10 report years, and creating a 10-year statute of limitations for the state to seek payment of unclaimed property due to the state. In addition, this legislation aligns the state’s record retention requirement for companies with the statute of limitations and look back period, which brings State law into conformity with a majority of other states. This bill also offers any company currently under audit prior to July 22, 2015, the opportunity to convert their audit into a voluntary disclosure agreement by entering into the Secretary of State Voluntary Disclosure Agreement program. All companies who received a notice of examination and are currently under audit as of the effective date of this Act will have the opportunity to engage in an expedited audit review process. Finally, the bill mandates that interest be assessed on any late-filed unclaimed property, as a means to incentivize voluntary compliance. See previous UPPO’s May 4 blog post for more information about S.B. 13. 


Effective on June 29, 2017, S.B. 79 makes changes and corrections to SB 13. Among these changes, the amended bill ensures holders have sufficient time to comply with SB 13’s due diligence requirements with owners. It further clarifies that the state will indemnify and defend a holder against claims made by a foreign jurisdiction for property paid or delivered to the state escheator in good faith.



Effective on July 1, 2017, H.B. 152 establishes an exemption from Unclaimed Property law for nonprofit corporations providing telecommunications service and delivery of electric power.



Effective on Jan. 1, 2018, S.B. 9 creates the Revised Uniform Unclaimed Property Act. It adds language concerning definitions, applicability, rulemaking, and presumptively abandoned property. The bill also includes rules for taking custody of property that is presumed abandoned, reporting requirements, and required notice to property owners, among other provisions. The bill expressly excludes gift cards, loyalty cards and game-related digital content from property subject to escheat. However, it does not exclude gift cards from the definition of “stored-value cards,” which are subject to escheat, creating a potential conflict. The bill also specifies that virtual currency is subject to escheat. The state’s business-to-business exemption is not retained under the new bill.


New Hampshire 

Effective on Jan. 1, 2018, H.B. 473 increases the threshold above which merchants can sell gift cards with expiration dates from $100 to $250. The bill further clarifies that gift certificates of $250 or less shall not be considered abandoned property, and it revises the definition of gift certificate by removing the requirement that a gift certificate be in writing. The bill also provides that gift certificates and store credits remitted to the state prior to Jan. 1, 2018, must remain in the custody of the state until returned to the owner.


South Dakota

Effective on March 10, 2017, S.B. 34 revises provisions related to securities held as unclaimed property. It requires the state treasurer to sell all stocks, bonds, and other negotiable instruments within 90 days of confirmed receipt, unless the property is on an open claim.


Effective on July 1, 2017, H.B. 1081 revises provisions for establishing a trust for a mineral owner who cannot be located. It provides that a person or entity holding interest in a tract of land may petition a county court to create a trust in favor of an undetermined owner of a mineral interest in that tract of land. It further provides conditions for the creation and administration of such a trust.



Effective on July 1, 2017, H.B. 420 repeals and reenacts the Uniform Unclaimed Property Act. It includes dormancy periods, reporting and due diligence requirements, and abandoned life insurance provisions, among other measures. The bill requires the treasurer to sell or liquidate securities between eight months and one year after receiving the security. 



Effective on Sept. 1, 2017, S.B. 561 relates to unclaimed life insurance and annuity contract proceeds. Among its provisions, the bill requires an insurer to periodically compare its applicable in-force life insurance policies, annuity contracts, and retained asset accounts against a Death Master File. In the event of a match, insurers are required to complete a good faith review of the situation, and if proceeds may be due, to conduct outreach to beneficiaries within 90 days and provide assistance in making a claim. The bill further requires an insurer to report and deliver unclaimed proceeds to the comptroller of public accounts.


Effective on Sept. 1, 2017, H.B. 2964 adopts a Senate amendment and provides that a holder of mutual fund shares must notify an owner at initial purchase that the owner may designate a representative to receive a notice of abandonment.



Effective on May 8, 2017, H.B. 175 repeals and reenacts the Revised Uniform Unclaimed Property Act. Among its provisions, the bill revises presumptions of abandonment, amends reporting procedures, and addresses the duties of a holder of abandoned or unclaimed property.


Effective on May 8, 2017, H.B. 42 makes comprehensive revisions to insurance law. Among other changes, the bill amends definitions under the Unclaimed Life Insurance and Annuity Benefits Act by removing the definition of "Knowledge of death."


For the latest information about these and other noteworthy unclaimed property bills, visit UPPO’s govWATCH website. 


About the contributor 

Marcella Easly, senior compliance advisor at Unclaimed Property Consulting & Reporting (UPCR), contributes to UPPO’s regular legislative update blog posts. Easly has more than 30 years of unclaimed property experience with special focus in state legislative tracking and resolving client-state advocacy issues. She was Unclaimed Property Manager for the State of Oregon for 14 years.  She was active in the National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators (NAUPA), serving as president, and regional vice president.  She was instrumental in the creation of the NAUPA property type reporting codes.  She has been with UPCR for 11 years, and has been active in UPPO for more than 13 years.   



Tags:  Delaware  Idaho  Illinois  legislation  New Hampshire  South Dakota  Tennessee  Texas  unclaimed property  Utah 

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