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UNCLAIMED PROPERTY FOCUS is a blog written by and for UPPO members, featuring diverse perspectives and insights from unclaimed property practitioners across the U.S. and Canada. We welcome your submissions to Unclaimed Property Focus. Please contact Tim Dressen via tim@uppo.org with any questions about submitting a blog post for consideration and refer to our editorial guidelines when writing your blog post. Disclaimer: Information and/or comments to this blog is not intended as a substitute for legal advice on compliance or reporting requirements.

 

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Texas responds to UPPO’s request for clarification of H.B. 1454

Posted By Administration, Thursday, May 18, 2017

Passed in June 2015, Texas law H.B. 1454 goes into effect on Sept. 1, 2017. The law allows property owners to designate a “representative for notice,” which triggers a requirement that the holder must mail or email the required due diligence notice to both the representative and the owner.

 

Representatives may not claim or access the owner’s property, but can stop the dormancy period by communicating with the holder knowledge of the owner’s location and confirmation that the owner has not abandoned the property. The new requirements also require holders to include the name and last-known mailing or email address of the representative when reporting unclaimed property.

 

In December 2016, UPPO posed several questions to Texas unclaimed property officials in an effort to receive clarity about the new requirements for the holder community. On April 24, 2017, Texas responded. The letter from Texas is prefaced with a statement advising that the letter is intended to provide general guidance and that no formal changes have been adopted by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts (comptroller).

 

Covered property types

UPPO sought clarity regarding which property types are covered by the law, specifically asking if IRAs and both open-end and closed-end mutual funds are covered. In its response, Texas specified that funds deposited with a bank or other financial institution in an interest-bearing account, checking account or savings account are included. This includes mutual funds held in an IRA, but those “would not be subject to abandonment until they would normally be reportable as unclaimed property.”

 

Methods to obtain representative information

Texas clarified that although the comptroller will provide a form holders may provide to owners to designate a representative it is not required and therefore other methods used to collect this information are acceptable. Texas expects to make the form available before Sept. 1, 2017, and “anticipate[s] that holders will inform customers of the option to designate a representative.”

 

Criteria for becoming a representative

UPPO requested clarification regarding specific criteria for being designated a representative and whether the designated person has to provide consent. Texas responded that it anticipates requiring that the representative be an individual over 18 years old who does not own the account. The state doesn’t anticipate requiring a legal relationship between the owner and representative, or requiring consent.

 

Duration and reporting of representative appointment

Texas anticipates its representative designation form will give holders the ability to specify the duration of the designation, according to the letter. Without such stipulation, the designation would be perpetual unless revoked. It seems likely that the form will actually give the ability to specify the duration of the designation to owners—not holders—and that the wording in the letter was an error.

 

Holders would not need to notify the comptroller of changes to designated representatives, only to list them when reporting unclaimed property. The comptroller is updating its electronic holder report format to accommodate representative details. The updated format should be announced before Sept. 1, 2017.

 

Multiple accounts

The state clarified that the representative designation form will give owners the ability to specify the accounts for which the representative is a designee. There will be an “all accounts” option. Communication from the representative regarding one account does not affect the abandonment period for any accounts for which that person is not designated as a representative.

 

UPPO will continue to monitor implementation of H.B. 1454 and will report on additional developments as needed.

 

 

Tags:  compliance  due diligence  Texas  unclaimed property 

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New Pennsylvania and Texas due diligence requirements raise questions

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 21, 2017

In recent years, Pennsylvania and Texas enacted new unclaimed property due diligence requirements that affect holders this year. In both cases, the statutes raise several questions for holders required to comply with the new requirements.

 

Pennsylvania

Last year, Pennsylvania amended its unclaimed property law, effective Sept. 12, 2016. Among the changes was the addition of a due diligence requirement. According to draft guidance from the state, the new due diligence requirement applies to all property to be reported on April 15, 2017.  

 

The due diligence requirement specifies that property holders must send a notice to owners between 60 and 120 days before reporting the property to the state treasurer. The requirement applies to any property valued at $50 or more for which the holder has an owner address it believes is valid.

 

Holders are also permitted to provide optional, additional notice any time between the date of last activity by, or communication with, the owner and the escheatment date, under the new requirement.

 

Unless the holder has valid consent from the owner for electronic contact the owner, written notice must be sent by first-class mail. The holder is required to include descriptions of the property and property ownership, value of the property (if known) and information for contacting the holder to avoid escheatment of the property.

 

The due diligence requirement’s language raises several questions for holders. It is unclear whether having valid consent to communicate electronically triggers a requirement that the holder must provide the notice electronically, or if the holder has the option to provide notice either electronically or by first class mail.

 

It is also unclear what constitutes owner consent to receive the due diligence notice electronically. Does the consent have to specifically mention due diligence notices? Does consent apply if the owner agreed to receive only specific types of documents, such as tax forms, electronically?

 

UPPO has raised these questions via comments to Pennsylvania’s treasurer in hopes of receiving clarification for the holder community.

 

Texas

In June 2015, Texas passed H.B. 1454, which includes new due diligence requirements, effective on Sept. 1, 2017. Under the new requirements, if a property owner has designated a “representative for notice,” the holder must mail or email the written notice required upon presumption of abandonment to the representative in addition to mailing the notice to the owner.

 

The requirements specify that, although the designated representative does not have any rights to claim or access the property, the dormancy period will cease if the representative communicates to the holder knowledge of the owner’s location and confirms that the owner has not abandoned the property.

 

Holders are also required, under the new requirements, to include the name and last-known mailing or email address of the representative for notice designated by the holder.

 

As with Pennsylvania’s new requirements, the Texas requirements raise several questions for holders:

  • What types of property are covered? The law specifies mutual funds, deposit accounts and safe deposit boxes, but doesn’t specify whether both open-end and closed-end mutual funds, and IRAs are included?
  • What are the acceptable methods for obtaining representative information? The requirement specifies that the comptroller provides a form that a holder may make available to an owner to designate a representative. However, it does not specify whether this is the only acceptable method for collecting this information.
  • Is there any criteria for being designated as a representative for notice, and does the designated representative have to provide any sort of consent to serving this role?
  • How long does a designation of being a representative for notice last, and are there any requirements for an owner to revoke this designation and/or for a holder to notify Texas of the revocation?
  • If the owner holds multiple accounts with the same holder, is designation of a representative for notice on one account considered applicable to all accounts? Likewise, does a representative response regarding one account automatically reflect interest in all of the owner’s accounts maintained by the holder?

UPPO has raised these questions with Texas officials and will continue to monitor implementation of the new requirements.

 

 

Tags:  due diligence  Pennsylvania  Texas  unclaimed property 

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